Three Beliefs of the Agile Mind-Set

Key to solving any complex problem is that the end-state or outcome will not be fully known or understood at the outset

The Agile Complexity Belief

Key to solving any complex problem is that the end-state or outcome will not be fully known or understood at the outset.

Much like Schrödinger’s Cat – trying to solve a complex & adaptive problem means you’ll be changing the nature and parameters of the problem itself.

Takeaway: Don’t approach complex problems with a linear belief in resolution.

Example: During a MiFID II project, the technical delivery team had to start building the underlying database without knowing exactly what data they’d be sourcing and aggregating – thus the project was complex and in part unknown.

The Agile People Belief

For an Agile team to flourish, it should be trusted. This means team members should be inter-dependent on each other as well as self-organising.

A combination of trust and allowing a team to self-organise is a very strong message from Stakeholders – showing that they believe in the people they have hired to deliver what is required.

Takeaway: Stakeholders should trust their team members to get on with it.

Example: I once hired a Technical BA who was largely left to her own devices to come up with ides and options on some complex trade date. She owned it and did a fantastic job.

The Agile Proactive Belief

Proactive belief means that team members should feel and believe that their efforts can and will result in delivery and continuous improvement.

Takeaway: We can do it!

Example: When delivering a client-facing FX Trading platform the team unexpected had some spare time before delivery. We seized that spare time to by working out as a team what we’d like to improve & add – then we did it. The resulting platform won industry awards.

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